Conditions treated

You will find a brief description of the conditions I treat and links to leaflets from various professional organisations, which will give you an overall idea of the conditions and its treatment options.

Please click on individual conditions for more information.

Menstrual irregularities (Period problems)

Most women have a normal menstrual cycle ranging from 21 to 35 days, with a period (bleeding) for less than 7 days’ duration. Irregularities would mean cycles are shorter or longer; heavier or lighter than normal; severe pain with bleeding; bleeding in between periods or with sexual intercourse

 

For more information – Click on the following links (opens in a new window)

 

NHS Choices – Irregular periods

 

Patient.info – Menstruation and its disorders

Pelvic Organ Prolapse

This refers to the bulging of one or more pelvic organs in to or out of the vagina, which occurs due to a weakness in the muscles, ligaments or the fascia (supporting tissue) that hold the pelvic organs (bladder, bowel, vagina and the uterus) in place.

 

Types of prolapse

 

Anterior vaginal wall prolapse or cystocele: is the prolapse of the front wall of the vagina in to or out of the vagina, involving the bladder and the urethra (tube draining the bladder to the outside)

Uterine or womb prolapse occurs when the womb prolapses in to or out of the vagina.

 

Posterior vaginal wall prolapse or rectocele or rectoenetrocele occurs when the back wall of the vagina bulges in to or out of the vagina (involving the small bowel or the rectum or back passage).

 

Vault prolapse occurs following a hysterectomy, when the top of the vagina prolapses in to the vagina or out of the vaginal opening.

 

For more information – Click on the following links (opens in a new window)

Pelvic organ prolapse        

          Click here for information from the International Urogynaecological Association (IUGA) 

         

          Click here for information from patient.info

Urinary incontinence

Urinary incontinence is an uncontrollable (involuntary) loss of urine.

 

There are two main types of urinary incontinence

 

Stress urinary incontinence is most common and the leakage occurs when the pressure on the bladder is increased, as in coughing, sneezing or exercise.

 

Urgency urinary incontinence occurs when you have an urgent desire to pass urine and you often do not make it to the toilet. It is also considered under the term overactive bladder.

 

For more information – Click on the following links (opens in a new window)

 

Urinary incontinence

         

          Click here for information from the British Association of Urological Surgeons (BAUS)

          Click here for information from patient.info


 Overactive bladder         

          Click here for information from the International Urogynaecological Association (IUGA) 

         

          Click here for information from the British Association of Urological Surgeons (BAUS)

          Click here for information from patient.info

Stress urinary incontinence

          Click here for information from the International Urogynaecological Association (IUGA) 

         

          Click here for information from the British Association of Urological Surgeons (BAUS)

          Click here for information from patient.info

 

Recurrent urinary tract infection

          Click here for information from the International Urogynaecological Association (IUGA) 

         

          Click here for information from the British Association of Urological Surgeons (BAUS)

          Click here for information from patient.info

Bladder Diary

          Click here for information from the International Urogynaecological Association (IUGA) 

         

          Click here for information from the British Association of Urological Surgeons (BAUS)

          Click here for information from patient.info

Understanding Pelvic organ prolapse (Video)

Urinary incontinence (Video)

Spire Hospital Bristol

Redland Hill, Durdham Down

Bristol

BS6 6UT

Tel:

0117 9804075

Email:

Faye.Dunn@Spirehealthcare.com

Follow us for more updates

Contact for more information